And So I Go: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

Posts Tagged ‘Wisconsin Teachers Unions Thugs March 2011

Wisconsin Fight Goes to Court – Robert Costa – National Review Online.

The fight goes on in Wisconsin and it is important to all of us because it shows just how far the Left will go to force it’s way on We the people.  There are simply no limits on the dirt and thuggery the Left will use.  I am not against using the court system to right what one sees as a wrong so I am not speaking here of the challenge to the newly passed law in the courts, but I am very much opposed to the  behind the scene thuggery that is going on and has been going on all the way thru this Wisconsin fight for democracy.    And believe that is what is it all about:  will democracy and the democratic system of government win out or will the lawless mobs rule in America?

I am posting the  entire article here because what has happened and is happening now in Wisconsin needs to be understood  as it is sure to be repeated over and over again in every state that opposed  the lawless communist/socialist  union leadership. BB

Wisconsin Fight Goes to Court

And Walker’s big win could ride on a single judicial election.

Listen to the Audio Version

As the dust settles in Madison, Wisconsin Republicans face a troubling coda: Gov. Scott Walker’s budget-repair bill is being tripped up in the courts. Union heavies smell blood. And the unruly parade of lefty activists and hulking Teamsters that occupied the state capitol for weeks is back for a bruising final round.

On paper, at issue is whether senate Republicans violated the state’s open-meeting laws. In mid-March, after a three-week stalemate, GOP lawmakers hustled Walker’s bill to the floor. The senate clerk approved the maneuver. But 14 Democratic state senators, on the lam in Illinois, howled in absentia. So did their comrades in Dane County government, who quickly filed suit. A sympathetic county judge put the brakes on implementation.

The Walker administration, appalled, immediately urged a state appeals court to strike down the circuit court’s ruling. But the appellate panel threw up its hands last week and kicked the bill to the state supreme court. Meanwhile, the nonpartisan state legislative bureau, following protocol, published the bill on Friday, sending Democrats into a tizzy.

With fresh legal questions being raised daily, the bill’s status is as murky as a Charlie Sheen tweet. But the tedious tangle over quorum rules and publication guidelines is merely a proxy for enraged progressives. The governor has beaten them at the polls and in the legislature. To topple his signature law, they need a black-robed coup.

Pressure is mounting on the seven-member high court to weigh in. If they do, the bill risks being overturned. For the moment, judicial conservatives hold a 4–3 edge. But that could flip come April 5, when incumbent justice David Prosser, a former GOP legislator, battles JoAnne Kloppenburg, an environmental lawyer and veteran state attorney, for a ten-year term.

The Prosser–Kloppenburg bout has political implications beyond the fate of Walker’s bill. Numerous GOP state senators are facing recalls, and Walker himself could face one next year. If Prosser falls, it will be a heavy blow to Republicans, especially for the backbenchers who stood with Walker, many of whom had hoped to emerge from the fiery budget debate with their careers intact. State lawmakers will also soon redraw legislative districts based upon updated Census data. Republicans control both chambers and the governor’s office, making liberal challenges to reapportionment decisions all the more likely.

“This is for all the marbles,” says Charlie Sykes, a prominent conservative talk-radio host in Milwaukee. “Scott Walker could survive losing the state senate. But it would be devastating if he were to lose in the supreme court. If Prosser loses, almost everything that Walker enacted could be overturned.” The high court, he worries, has a long history of activism, especially when liberals hold the majority.

Prosser, a gruff 68-year-old who has sat on the bench since 1998, has been blindsided by the national spotlight. In February, he coasted in a nonpartisan, multicandidate primary with 55 percent of the vote, more than double that of Kloppenburg, who finished second. Prosser saw a relatively smooth path to victory, especially against a little-known, left-leaning lawyer in a sleepy, springtime skirmish. Besides, Walker, in his second month at the reins, was popular with voters, as were conservatives, who swept the state’s November elections.

Then Madison erupted. Within hours of the primary, Walker began to unveil his budget agenda. The governor and statehouse Republicans went to the mats against the public-sector unions on collective bargaining, not yielding in their stand against unchecked labor power. Democrats, depressed after their poor 2010 showing, suddenly began to show alarming signs of life. Swarms of protesters, huddled like carolers, screamed outside of Walker’s office deep into the night; dreadlocked undergraduates gleefully papered the capitol’s marble halls with anti-Walker messages scrawled onto cardboard posters.

Amidst the melee, the supreme-court race drew scant notice during the first week of rallies, with only a few signs, mostly toted by graybeard professors, urging the throngs to “Vote Kloppenburg.” After the bill was signed by Walker, however, union brass and local Democrat friendlies, bitter and seeking a cause du jour, immediately jumped into the fray.

The buzz did not end at the Dane County border. Voices from the liberal blogosphere, at Firedoglake and the Daily Kos, sat up and started to alert their audiences. Their brethren in Wisconsin began to organize on the ground. Prosser, a tad surprised at the sudden interest, dug in and prepared for the onslaught. “At this point, I do not think that we have the choice as to whether our race is nationalized,” says Brian Nemoir, Prosser’s campaign manager.

Yet Prosser’s ability to respond to the rising interest has been hamstrung. He, along with Kloppenburg, is the recipient of public funds — $300,000 for the general election, to be exact — and both have pledged not to spend a dime more. “Looking back, that was one decision they should not have done,” says one state GOP strategist. “Their ability to respond to charges, and build up a stronger internal organization, has been severely limited.”

But it is a different story for special-interest groups. The Greater Wisconsin Committee, a leftist organizing group with deep union ties, has funneled $3 million into anti-Prosser advertising, taking relentlessly to the airwaves. “They are the Left’s biggest political player in the state,” says Brett Healy, the president of the MacIver Institute, a Wisconsin-based think tank. “They run the ads that no one else wants to run.”

(Understand this People?   Prosser, the Conservative candidate who was winning and the radical Kloppenburg promised not to spend over the state allotted  funds for campaining.  So now the radical union thugs are going after Prosser with their almost unlimited union dues money!  BB)

Indeed. The GWC (The Greater Wisconsin Committee, a leftist organizing group with deep union ties,) is airing ads that tie Prosser to the budget bill. “Prosser equals Walker” is the usual theme. But those political attacks are fluff compared with the group’s latest smear, a dimly-lit, creepy spot that casts Prosser as soft on pedophilia. That ad alleges that Prosser, as a local district attorney three decades ago, failed to properly prosecute a Catholic priest accused of molesting several boys. Prosser, according to those who know him, is said to be furious about the ad, angry with its inaccuracies and how it sullies his name.

At a debate late last week, Prosser, his displeasure barely concealed, urged Kloppenburg to ask the GWC to pull the ad. “It is the worst ad that has ever been run in a judicial campaign,” he asserted. Kloppenburg would not budge. “Like it or not, third parties have a right to run ads of their choosing,” she replied. Prosser fired back: “If some third party ran an ad supporting me and attacking you, and it was despicable, and it was a lie, I would stand up and ask that the ad be pulled,” he argued. “You are not willing to do that, even at the request of the victim in the ad?”

Prosser noted that Troy Merryfield, one of the abuse victims, has spoken out against the clip, and in support of Prosser’s decision to not prosecute at the time.

“I do not appreciate myself or my case being used for political advantage, especially in today’s climate of dirty politics,” Merryfield wrote in a recent statement. “In 1979, as a prosecutor, Prosser made a decision to not file charges against [Rev. John] Feeney due to his concern about the emotional toll that a jury trial would have on my brother and me due to our young age at the time.” Prosser, he added, had his full support.

Regardless, the hit left a mark. Two sources with knowledge of internal GOP polling tell us that Prosser and Kloppenburg are near even, a bad sign for the incumbent. “She has driven his negatives up,” one source says. “It will be hard to drive hers up. Her lack of judicial experience should hurt her, but it also makes her harder to pin down. The question now is: Does the Right have enough resources to counter the Greater Wisconsin Committee’s millions? And even if they do, is it too late? It is going to be touch-and-go for these last few days.”

Brian Nemoir, Prosser’s top aide, reiterates that the campaign will highlight Kloppenburg’s judicial inexperience. Keeping the focus on that, and off Walker, is a must. Her environmental-law record and her associations with leading liberal lights such as Chief Justice Shirley Abrahamson, Prosser’s main ideological foe on the court, who once hired Kloppenburg as an intern, will be detailed in campaign material.

Prosser will also make Kloppenburg’s not-so-subtle ties to the anti-Walker movement a constant refrain. This tack, Nemoir says, is crucial in pointing out how Kloppenburg’s campaign is being used by liberal interests to manipulate Wisconsin law.

Nemoir points to a recent meeting with the Capital Times, where Kloppenburg ruminated on the state of Wisconsin politics, as a trouble spot for state attorney. “The events of the last few weeks have put into sharp relief how important the Supreme Court is as a check on overreach in the other branches of government,” Kloppenburg said in conversation with editors.

Overreaching?” Nemoir exclaims. That statement, he argues, is a “wink and nod” to the assembling anti-Walker forces aligning behind her campaign. “You would have to be a complete idiot to think that she is referencing anything else. It is a nod to those who are supporting her.”

Perhaps, but for both candidates, avoiding a dip into the budget-bill swamp is getting tricky. Neither wants to risk recusal. Prosser is also being forced to address the roiling political scene, albeit indirectly. At the Friday debate, he was asked to comment on how courts should address cases dealing with legislative procedure (hint, hint). “You have to look with clear eyes whether some procedure was violated, whether there is a real emergency, what was done,” he said. “I pledge, as I have for the last twelve and a half years, that as a justice, that I will look at these things impartially.”

Prosser’s independent cred increasingly is the backbone of his message, especially as portions of the electorate sour on Walker’s bill and the GOP in general. To bolster his cause, he has enlisted strong bipartisan backing from the political establishment. Two former Badger State governors, Tommy Thompson, a Republican, and Patrick Lucey, a Democrat, serve as his campaign chairmen. Four former Supreme Court justices are in his camp, as are a bevy of district attorneys, sheriffs, and lawmakers. Prosser’s kitchen cabinet has been an asset, says Sheriff David Clarke, Milwaukee’s top law-enforcement official and self-described “Kennedy Democrat.” He says that Prosser may find support from more Democrats — and cops — than most liberal politicos realize. “I have been in law enforcement for 33 years in this county,” he says. “I don’t like activist judges who tend to legislate from the bench.”

Kloppenburg, he sighs, “has tipped her hand that she will be an activist judge by her associations and some of her coded language in the debates.” He wants none of that.

Nevertheless, despite cross-party support, Prosser’s reputation has a few nicks. He is known, friends say, for both his sharp mind and his quick temper. In any other year, Prosser’s prickly nature would be shrugged off, but Kloppenburg’s allies are doing everything they can to make an issue out of Prosser’s past outbursts. Last week, leaked e-mails of Prosser’s calling Chief Justice Abrahamson an expletive and threatening to “destroy” her were published. Prosser attributed the harsh words to heated internal court communications and apologized. He added, in interviews, that though he was wrong to have used salty language, he was participating in the give-and-take of a court known for its activism and dysfunction. State GOP operatives say they are confident that Prosser can overcome any slams against his character. As a former assembly speaker and justice for more than a decade, he will be able to dodge the small punches. “He had so much support before this all started,” chimes Rep. Michelle Litjens, a Republican in the state assembly. “He is seen as a very fair, levelheaded, and balanced individual. People supported him before, and I know they will stick with him.”

Republicans are taking nothing for granted. Mark Jefferson, the executive director of the state GOP, acknowledges that the race has become high-stakes drama. Party leaders, he tells me, will be reaching out to voters via social-media tools, such as Facebook and Twitter, to campaign for Prosser, since they cannot give directly to his campaign per campaign-finance rules.

With the state Republican apparatus mostly sitting on its hands and wallets, the Wisconsin Club for Growth is planning to step in with more than $300,000 to boost Prosser. They did the same for him during the primary, playing a major role in generating early momentum. Wisconsin Manufacturers & Commerce (WMC), a chamber of commerce–type group, will also be instrumental in helping Prosser compete financially with the GWC and its progressive offshoots.

James Buchen, vice president of WMC, says that his organization is prepared to spend millions to lift Prosser’s campaign. “We can’t quite match the $3 million from [the GWC], but we will come very close,” he says. “There is quite of bit of energy on the right — the silent majority, if you will. So this could go either way.”

As the campaign hurtles toward the finish line, “turnout could carry the day,” observes Gary Marx, the executive director of the Judicial Crisis Network. “The Left is making this a blood feud; they are making this about vengeance.”

Any enthusiasm gap, he says, will only be widened, since the April ballot is sparse. “This resembles a special election; it stands alone. Republicans will need to remember the basic blocking and tackling of grassroots politics — mail, phone, and radio.”

According to state-election figures, nonpartisan spring elections usually draw less than 20 percent of the electorate: 18 percent in 2009, 19 percent in 2008, 19 percent in 2007, and 12 percent in 2006. To win, GOP officials say Prosser will need to draw strong numbers from emerging conservative pockets in Waukesha, Washington, Ozaukee, and Racine counties. If voters from these areas don’t show, but liberals pile into voting booths in Dane County and Madison proper, Kloppenburg could cruise to victory.

“Look, this race is not a referendum on the governor or a specific piece of legislation,” Brian Nemoir says. “It has a much broader scope. supreme-court judges are elected to ten-year terms on purpose. Their elections are not intended to be snapshot responses to the current political environment.”

For Team Prosser, and nervous conservatives, that is the hope.

Advertisements

The Republicans in Wisconsin finally gave up trying to reason with the missing Democrats and took the item concerning collective bargaining for public employees out of the budget bill.  By removing this item from the finance bill they could vote on the item  without a Democrat being present.  This is what they did and of course the item passed.  Wisconsin teachers will not have the right to collectively bargain for pension and health care benefits but they will still be able to collectively bargain for wages.  This is by no means union busting , or maybe it is because now employees can decide for themselves if they want to join the union and fork over several hundred dollars every year to an outfit of thugs with whom they may not agree.  This morning on FOX and FRIENDS   they showed the figures of all the money the union had collected in dues in Wisconsin last year and that money would have hired 151 teachers!   Remember that in Wisconsin and most other states where the unions control people are forced to join and pay dues and they then have no say how their dues are spent. BB

If you like a more spicy read you might want top follow Michelle Malkin on this .

Wisconsin GOP Finds Way Around Fleebaggers; Senate Votes to Strip Bargaining Rights for Public Workers

By Doug Powers  •  March 9, 2011 08:44 PM

**Written by Doug Powers

Scott Walker’s Budget Repair Bill Moves to Assembly for Final Passage

by Brett Healy

Three weeks after Senate Democrats fled the state, the Wisconsin State Senate passed the bulk of the Budget Repair Bill in a series of swift and deliberate moves Wednesday.

Late in the afternoon, Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald and the GOP lawmakers assembled for the Special Session voted to send the bill to a bipartisan Senate-Assembly Conference Committee.

“This afternoon, following a week and a half of line‐by‐line negotiation, Sen. Miller sent me a letter that offered three options: 1) keep collective bargaining as is with no changes, 2) take our counter‐offer, which would keep collective bargaining as is with no changes, 3) or stop talking altogether,” said Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau).  “With that letter, I realized that we’re dealing with someone who is stalling indefinitely, and doesn’t have a plan or an intention to return. His idea of compromise is “give me everything I and the only negotiating he’s doing is through the media.”

Shortly after 6pm, the Conference Committee convened and quickly approved Fitzgerald’s changes to the budget bill over the forceful objections of Assembly Minority Leader Peter Barca (D-Kenosha).

Democrats fled the state on February 17th in an extreme parliamentary maneuver to prevent a 3/5th quorum from being present.

The Wisconsin Constitution requires more than a simple majority for passage of appropriation bills.  A quorum of 3/5 of each house of the legislature is needed to pass any bill that “imposes, continues or renews a tax, or creates a debt or charge, or makes, continues or renews an appropriation of public or trust money, or releases, discharges or commutes a claim or demand of the state.”

To dispatch the 3/5th quorum concerns, the Conference Committee amended the bill, stripping it of appropriations and bonding authority but retaining the collective bargaining changes and other provisions.

It was a move many had speculated for weeks that the GOP could make. On Wednesday, Senate GOP leaders pulled the trigger.

From Illinois, Senate Minority Leader Mark Miller (D-Monona) issued a statement, “Tonight, 18 Senate Republicans conspired to take government away from the people,” Miller said. “We will join the people of Wisconsin in taking back their government.”

Among the items removed from the bill were nearly $250 million in debt restructuring and lapses of authorized spending to the Department of Administration, as well as a reversal on the sale of state power plants to private entities.

Increased funding to the Department of Corrections and the state’s Medicaid programs, needed to forestall shortfalls in those programs were also not included in the Conference Committee report. Planned changes to the Earned Income Tax Credit and an audit of eligibility requirements for state entitlement programs were also scrapped.

Despite the presence of financial provisions in the bill, Fitzgerald said in the Conference Committee the move to vote was reviewed and cleared by three important non-partisan state agencies – the Legislative Fiscal Bureau, the Legislative Council and the Legislative Reference Bureau.

“The people of Wisconsin elected us to do a job,” Fitzgerald said. “They elected us to stand up to the broken status quo, stop the constant expansion of government, balance the budget, create jobs and improve the economy.”

The unamendable bill now awaits action in the State Assembly where passage is expected.

» Unions Storm Madison, Break Windows: Capital in Chaos – Big Government.

This is the capital of Wisconsin today:

Unions Storm Madison, Break Windows: Capital in Chaos

by Publius

From Big Government correspondent on the scene:

We have almost completely lost control of the Capitol building. We now only control the 3rd and 4th floors.

Teachers Unions are sending out robo calls and emails to all their members, asking them to get to the capitol NOW. We know this as a fact.

Democrat Senators are opening windows and letting protesters in. Door’s have been ripped off their hinges.

Next 6-8 hours will determine who controls the capitol. If we lose control, the assembly can’t meet tomorrow.

Quasi-military forces are the only option to win back control of building. They are very close to being called in.

Law enforcement are leaking legislators whereabouts to protesters. No one is safe.

Today they escorted State Senators across the street via an underground tunnel. It’s top secret, but protesters were waiting for them.

National Guard may be called in….plans have been set. We are running out of options.

More from Wisconsin:

America 2011: Security Forces Struggle to Get Control of Wisconsin Capitol

by Publius

A mob currently controls the Wisconsin capitol building. They are trying to prevent an elected legislature from convening. If the left will go this far to protect their own pampered status in one state, imagine what they’ll do when we have to tackle the federal budget crisis.

From BG’s man-on-the-scene, Josiah Cantrall:

[The Assembly] are still planning on convening at 11 am CST.  If they can get control of the building…  As of right now, even the legislators themselves aren’t sure of it’s status.

Police control the lobby to the Assembly Chambers. They think they are in a position to take back control of the actual Chambers. However, right now all they control is the lobby.

Today members of the Assembly will be going to Madison though.

At a certain time, security forces will pick up legislators from their houses, proceed to Madison, drop them off at another secure location where they will receive new instructions.

Madison police won’t be used due to their lack of cooperation.  State troopers and other statewide security forces will provide the escort.

If they get inside, they will give the Democrats a set time when the vote will take place.  No amendments.  Democrats are free to do whatever in the meantime. Go into caucus, scream at the Republican etc. But once they reach the set time, if the building is still secure, the vote will be taken.

For security reasons, exact time of vote will not be released until 11 am.

Note that ’security forces’ will be escorted legislators to the capital.

Wisconsin GOP Senators Face Death Threats; MSM Ignores

by Publius

From 620AM Radio in Wisconsin:

Since the MSM appears intent on downplaying the growing intimidation and escalating threats of violence around the union power issue, I am reprinting verbatim an email that was sent to Republican senators. The email was signed, but I have deleted the name pending what I hope will be a thorough police investigation.

From: XXXX

Sent: Wed 3/9/2011 9:18 PM

To: Sen.Kapanke; Sen.Darling; Sen.Cowles; Sen.Ellis; Sen.Fitzgerald; Sen.Galloway; Sen.Grothman; Sen.Harsdorf; Sen.Hopper; Sen.Kedzie; Sen.Lasee; Sen.Lazich; Sen.Leibham; Sen.Moulton; Sen.Olsen

Subject: Atten: Death threat!!!! Bomb!!!!

Please put your things in order because you will be killed and your familes [sic] will also be killed due to your actions in the last 8 weeks. Please explain to them that this is because if we get rid of you and your families then it will save the rights of 300,000 people and also be able to close the deficit that you have created. I hope you have a good time in hell. Read below for more information on possible scenarios in which you will die.

WE want to make this perfectly clear. Because of your actions today and in the past couple of weeks I and the group of people that are working with me have decided that we’ve had enough. We feel that you and the people that support the dictator have to die. We have tried many other ways of dealing with your corruption but you have taken things too far and we will not stand for it any longer. So, this is how it’s going to happen: I as well as many others know where you and your family live, it’s a matter of public records.

We have all planned to assult [sic]you by arriving at your house and putting a nice little bullet in your head. However, we decided that we wouldn’t leave it there. We also have decided that this may not be enough to send the message to you since you are so “high” on Koch and have decided that you are now going to single handedly make this a dictatorship instead of a demorcratic [sic]process. So we have also built several bombs that we have placed in various locations around the areas in which we know that you frequent.

This includes, your house, your car, the state capitol, and well I won’t tell you all of them because that’s just no fun. Since we know that you are not smart enough to figure out why thisis happening to you we have decided to make it perfectly clear to you. If you and your goonies feel that it’s necessary to strip the rights of 300,000 people and ruin their lives, making them unable to feed, clothe, and provide the necessities to their families and themselves then We Will “get rid of” (in which I mean kill) you. Please understand that this does not include the heroic Rep. Senator that risked everything to go aganist what you and your goonies wanted him to do. We feel that it’s worth our lives to do this, because we would be saving the lives of 300,000 people. Please make your peace with God as soon as possible and say goodbye to your loved ones we will not wait any longer. YOU WILL DIE!!!!

Remember, again, the proposal in Wisconsin would give state workers slightly more rights than federal workers currently enjoy. Their pay is not being cut. No one will be laid off. But, they will have to contribute something to the health and retirement benefits.

Wisconsin Capital in Meltdown

by Publius

From Josiah Cantrall, BG’s man-on-the-scene in Madison:

Capitol is in an uproar! A man sported a sign, “burn Walker”. Complete with a drawing of Gov. Walker withering in flames of fire.

Protesters recognized me from my Fox News appearances. One lady refused to leave me alone and began yelling my name and position to anyone who’d listen.

She approached a burly union man and continued with her, “Josiah” rant. He then followed me around for over ten minutes. I went up three floors, turned corners, visited every wing of the building and yet, he remained on my trail. He was at least two inches taller and 100 lbs heavier than me.

Approximately 3,500 protesters are present. When I left they had dragged a sound system into the capitol building. The first speaker was outraged by the “unconstitutional metal detectors”. He followed it up by declaring that any windows screwed down “violate the American Disabilities act”.

Much to the crowds delight, the main speaker promised ” we will break in tonight, the next night and the next night if we have too”. I left the scene as they began chanting, ” we wont leave”.

At 5:00 pm the entire Democrat caucus is rallying with crowd at State street and Carrol.

Wisconsin Educators Association Council is bringing in 15 busloads of teachers for the rally.

A man just dropped his pants….In defiance of Gov. Scott Walker.


See topic cloud at bottom of page for specific topics.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 97 other followers

BB’s file cabinet

Advertisements